William the Conqueror's Table


Photo © Anthony McIntosh

William landed at Bulverhythe on 28 September 1066, building a fort in Hastings and engaging Harold Godwinson’s (c.1022–1066) armies seven miles north of Hastings on Senlac Hill, now the town of Battle on 14 October 1066. Harold was killed, it is said, by an arrow that struck him in the eye. The events of the day, subsequently known as The Battle of Hastings, are depicted on the Bayeux Tapestry.


Photo © Anthony McIntosh

This stone slab was also know as ‘Old Woman’s Tap’ or ‘Tapshore’. It originally stood at the bottom of Maze Hill where a stream flowed over it. The stone was moved by Burton’s development to be opposite the Royal Victoria Hotel on the seafront. A Hastings Guide of 1794, cited by J. Manwaring-Baines, states that the rock known as William the Conqueror's Table, was also known as 'Old Woman's Tap' and was in St. Leonard's Gardens. A newspaper report from 1828 places the stone near the St. Leonard's Hotel. It was moved to near the entrance to the Pier some time in the 1960s,, when the Triodome was erected on the Pier to house the newly-made Hastings Embroidery. At some later date it was moved back to St. Leonards seafront.