ROGER D'AMONDEVILLE.

From Amondeville near Caen, spelt Amonderville in the Norman Exchequer rolls of 1198. The first of the name who came to England at the conquest in 1066 was Roger, sometimes called Humfries, one of the compilers of the Domesday survey. He was seneschal to Remigius, bishop of Lincoln, from whom he received four Lincolnshire manors, Kingerby, his principal seat and that of his successors, Auresby, Ellesham and Croxton. He married a daughter of sir Gerard Salvin of Thorpe-Salvin in Yorkshire, and left issue Jolland, John and Robert. Jolland married Beatrice Painel, by whom he had six sons, two of whom, William and Adam, received grants from Gilbert de Gand, earl of Lincoln, while another, Ralph, obtained from the earl of Albemarle the Yorkshire manor of Carlton. Helias de Amondevilla occurs in a roll of the Infeudationes Militum of 1172. The family continued of consequence in various parts of England. Hence the Irbys, lords Boston.

--(Falaise Roll)

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